On Your Grill

Your Online Grilling Resource

On Your Grill - Your Online Grilling Resource
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Grilled Potatoes

Potatoes are about the most versatile vegetable for the grill. There are literally thousands of ways to cook them, and yes, you can bake them right on your grill as well.

Baked Potatoes:

One thing I like to do, usually while grilling something else, is get whole potatoes, find some foil and make little bowls out of the foil. Add about a tablespoon of olive oil in each foil bowl. (NOT extra virgin, or any virgin for that matter) Then add seasoning by adding some sea salt, pepper, garlic salt or mince and some different herbs you like into the oil. Place the potato into the foil, wrap it up and place it on the back of the grill where you’re not cooking anything else. The heat will move the oil around the potato, keeping it moist, and the seasoning will add flavor. Try to keep them away from high heat. Medium heat is best for those little potatoes. They will need anywhere between 45 minutes to an hour to cook. Baked potatoes are done when you can stick the fork tines into the center easily. One note here: Be really careful when opening the foil because the steam and the oils inside can be super hot, and can scald you. Anyway…when you take those puppies off the grill, man what a delight is in store for all those that get to eat them.

 

Sliced Potatoes:

Grilling potatoes that are sliced is fun and easy. Remember though, cut potatoes cook fast and if you don’t watch them, they can turn into little black cuts really fast. Which way do you want to cut them? The only difference between a potato chip or slice and a potato wedge is the direction of the cut. Cut it lengthwise, it becomes a wedge or a fry. Cut it along the width, and it becomes a chip or a slice. Whichever way you decide to cut your potatoes, cut them then enough to cook quickly but large enough to not fall into the grill. Orientation helps here too. If you have cut potatoes that are thin enough to slip into the fiery abyss, then place them perpendicular or at an angle on the grids or grate. This will create grilling lines on them, so have fun with them. I like to sometimes rotate my slices so that the grid lines look somewhat like a checkerboard.

Skewed Potatoes:

I love to skew potatoes. The problem a lot of people have when skewing them is having them fall off the skewer. When cutting potatoes for skewing, I like to cut them into approximately one inch squares. I also like to keep as much of the skins on as possible. The types of potatoes also become a factor. Russet potatoes seem to just be a looser type of potato. They are fine for baking, but when skewing, I like to use the little red potatoes. They seem to be more dense and hold onto the skewer better. Some people say that if you skew them along their grain (lengthwise) they hold on better. I tend to put them on haphazardly and haven’t noticed this phenomenon. The key to cooking skewed potatoes on your grill seems to be that you need to watch them a little more.
Try this little tasty treat: Marinate them in a mayonnaise, rosemary, wine (white or blush) and garlic powder Mix. Place the potatoes into the marinade, and brush the marinade covering the potatoes. Let sit in the refrigerator for about an hour or so. Then nuke the potatoes for about 10 minutes. After the microwave is done, skew them and let them cook on the grill for 6 to 8 minutes until done. Lightly brush the marinade occasionally and turn them about half way through.

Sweet Potatoes:

Oh, and don’t forget those sweet potatoes. If you are baking them, reduce the oil in the foil bowls and add some butter or margarine. A half a teaspoon is probably enough. And for the herb seasonings, keep them in the sweet category. If you are slicing them, they pretty much cook like their white sisters. And if you are skewing them. Lookout! They tend to lose their grip on the skewer.

Category: Recipes
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